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Wednesday, October 15, 2014

News in Japan - ( Japan the 9th Best Country to Grow Old, Norway #1 / Japanese Man Arrested for Throwing Urine on Woman )


Norway named best place to grow old; Japan 9th


Japan Today



"Norway is the best place to grow old, according to the latest Global AgeWatch index of 96 countries published on Wednesday, while Afghanistan is the worst.
All but one of the top 10 countries are in Western Europe, North America and Australasia, with Japan the exception at ninth place, according to the ranking which comprises 91% of the global population over the age of 60.
Norway tops the index, pushing last year’s number one Sweden into second place in the second year the index has been released.
Unsurprisingly, African countries make up half of the lowest quarter of the index, although Venezuela, Turkey and Serbia are ranked 76th, 77th and 74th respectively.
HelpAge International, the charity which compiled the list, said economic growth in itself was not enough to improve the lives of older people.
“Specific policies need to be put in place to address the implications of ageing,” said the report, published on the United Nations International Day of Older Persons.
“Policies on income security in Mexico (30) have lifted it 26 places in the overall rankings since last year despite being less wealthy than Turkey (77).”

The index is based on 13 indicators grouped into four areas: income security; health status; capability, which includes employment and educational status; and the enabling environment, including issues such as physical safety.
Some countries fare better than others in different areas. Japan tops the rankings when it comes to health, while Switzerland has the best environment for older people.
This year’s report focuses particularly on income security, namely pensions, which older people consistently identify as their top priority to fend off the risk of poverty.
With rising numbers of old people—two billion over the age of 60 by 2050, a similar number as children under 15—HelpAge International chief Toby Porter said pensions were vital for all governments.
“Incomes are often too low to save for old age, which is why there’s such a need for a basic social pension now,” he said.
In low and middle-income countries, only one in four people over 65 receive a pension while worldwide, half of the global population do not have a pension, the report said.
But it applauds an “explosion” of new tax-financed, non-contributory pensions over the past two decades, which provide regular income for the very poorest.
Across Latin America, countries have “dramatically extended coverage” of social pensions, helping push them up the global rankings.
This reflects a global trend that saw China introduce a rural social pension in 2009, reaching 133 million more people, and Nepal and Thailand follow a similar route.
“In most European Union countries, pensions systems as a whole do more to reduce inequality than all other parts of the tax or benefit system combined,” said Porter.
The top 10 in the index are: Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, Canada, Germany, Netherlands, Iceland, United States, Japan and New Zealand.
The bottom 10 are: Iraq, Zambia, Uganda, Jordan, Pakistan, Tanzania, Malawi, West Bank and Gaza, Mozambique and Afghanistan. "
http://www.japantoday.com/category/lifestyle/view/norway-named-best-place-to-grow-old-japan-9th?utm_campaign=jt_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_source=jt_newsletter_2014-10-02_PM


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Man kicked to death in argument over ramen shop seat


Japan Today

"A Japanese man who allegedly kicked a fellow diner to death in a fight over seats in a ramen eatery calmly returned to his food as the other man lay dying, media reported Tuesday.
Shinichiro Imanishi, 37, was being questioned in connection with the death of a 49-year-old man whom he allegedly threw to the floor and then stamped on repeatedly in the ramen shop in Tokyo’s Kita Ward on Sept 27, a police spokesman told AFP.
The trouble erupted when Hisao Kitajima pulled a chair which Imanishi was using to rest his foot on, the spokesman said, adding Kitajima died of his injuries two days later.
Imanishi, who weighs 120 kilograms did nothing to help his victim after the frenzied attack, instead ordering a bowl of noodles, local media said.
Imanishi, who was arrested shortly after the incident, explained to fellow diners that he might as well eat his meal, reportedly saying: “I will go to jail. This will be my last supper.”"
http://www.japantoday.com/category/crime/view/man-kicked-to-death-in-argument-over-ramen-shop-seat?utm_campaign=jt_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_source=jt_newsletter_2014-10-01_PM


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20-year-old man arrested for pouring urine on woman


Japan Today

Police in Tokyo have arrested a 20-year-old man on assault charges after he poured urine from a bottle on the leg of a woman in Adachi Ward in August.
According to police, the suspect, Junichi Minezaki, an upholstery worker, approached the 24-year-old woman as she was returning to her home on Aug 2 and poured urine from a plastic bottle onto her right leg, TBS reported Wednesday.
On Tuesday, police publicly posted a photo of the suspect taken from a street surveillance camera. In the afternoon, police received a call from Minezaki saying he was the man in the photo and that he would turn himself in.
On Aug 20, a similar incident occurred in the same area in Adachi Ward, involving a high school girl. Police also said that in April and May of this year, a total of six cases were reported in which a man riding a bicycle flung urine on unsuspecting pedestrians.
Investigators are questioning Minezaki about his involvement in those incidents. 
http://www.japantoday.com/category/crime/view/20-year-old-man-arrested-for-pouring-urine-on-woman?utm_campaign=jt_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_source=jt_newsletter_2014-10-01_PM


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Teen admits killing mother, grandmother in response to ‘harsh discipline’: police



Japan Times - KYODO

"A Hokkaido teenager suspected of killing her mother and grandmother said she wanted to escape after they “harshly disciplined” her, police investigators said Thursday.
The 17-year-old high school student allegedly stabbed her mother, 47, and grandmother, 71, with a kitchen knife at their home in the town of Namporo, Hokkaido, early Wednesday. She was arrested later in the day.
The girl admitted to the allegations after initially denying them and did not express remorse, the investigators said.
Police say the bodies of the mother and grandmother were found face down in separate bedrooms with multiple stab wounds in the neck and chest.
The police quoted the student as saying she “wanted to get out of her current situation.”
Neighbors said the parents were known to be strict ever since she entered elementary school, making her do household chores such as clearing snow and walking the dog, rather than letting her play with friends.
Police suspect the teen’s frustration built up to the point that she attacked the pair while they were asleep.
Local media outlets initially reported the names of the slain but began withholding their identities after the teen’s arrest.
Information from the girl led to the discovery of a knife thought to be the murder weapon, in a park less than 5 km from the house.
The bodies were found by the teen’s 23-year-old sister when she returned from work at around 2:30 a.m. on Wednesday."
http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2014/10/02/national/crime-legal/teenage-girl-arrested-suspicion-killing-mother-grandmother/#.VDy1E2eSwbx

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As a male employee in Japan, you can't really leave the office at around, say, 3 p.m. to pick up your kids and still expect your boss to grade you favorably.


Japan Times

"Nobuo Komiya, a professor of criminology at Rissho University in Tokyo, saying that although measures are needed to prevent a repeat of the murder of a 6-year-old Kobe girl, it would be unrealistic for Japan to adopt the constant parental surveillance that is normal in many other countries. "



http://www.japantoday.com/category/quote-of-the-day/view/as-a-male-employee-in-japan-you-cant-really-leave-the-office-at-around-say-3-p-m-to-pick-up-your-kids-and-still-expect-your-boss-to-grade-you-favorably?utm_campaign=jt_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_source=jt_newsletter_2014-10-03_AM


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